theavc:


Hemsley’s most iconic character was created specifically for him, after All In The Family producer Norman Lear, seeking a match for Archie Bunker’s uncompromising, wheezing racism, honed in on the actor as someone who could convincingly go toe to toe. At the time, Hemsley was busy with Broadway, so Lear actually introduced the Jeffersons to the Bunkers two years before Hemsley officially joined the cast, leaving the door open for him by pairing Isabel Sanford’s “Weezie” with George’s brother Henry (played by Mel Stewart). The odd setup and constant explanations for why George was never around—which mostly had to do with George not wanting to consort with white people—all ended up being worth it once Hemsley finally arrived in 1973. Immediately it was clear that George Jefferson was the perfect foil for Archie Bunker: He was every bit as stubborn, bigoted, and yet strangely loveable in his awfulness, and within two years the Jeffersons moved on up out of Queens and into Manhattan—and onto their very own, equally lasting show.

Some thoughts on the life of Sherman Hemsley.

theavc:

Hemsley’s most iconic character was created specifically for him, after All In The Family producer Norman Lear, seeking a match for Archie Bunker’s uncompromising, wheezing racism, honed in on the actor as someone who could convincingly go toe to toe. At the time, Hemsley was busy with Broadway, so Lear actually introduced the Jeffersons to the Bunkers two years before Hemsley officially joined the cast, leaving the door open for him by pairing Isabel Sanford’s “Weezie” with George’s brother Henry (played by Mel Stewart). The odd setup and constant explanations for why George was never around—which mostly had to do with George not wanting to consort with white people—all ended up being worth it once Hemsley finally arrived in 1973. Immediately it was clear that George Jefferson was the perfect foil for Archie Bunker: He was every bit as stubborn, bigoted, and yet strangely loveable in his awfulness, and within two years the Jeffersons moved on up out of Queens and into Manhattan—and onto their very own, equally lasting show.

Some thoughts on the life of Sherman Hemsley.

theavc:


It may be the craziest, yeah. It gets a little weird. Just when you think it can’t take another left turn, it does. It certainly does have its moments.

Bryan Cranston has some things to tell you about the new season of Breaking Bad.

theavc:

It may be the craziest, yeah. It gets a little weird. Just when you think it can’t take another left turn, it does. It certainly does have its moments.

Bryan Cranston has some things to tell you about the new season of Breaking Bad.

theavc:


The A.V. Club: How did you land Iggy Pop to play the role of her father?
WM: We probably get the most questions about how we got him, what it was like to have him, and the buzz surrounding somebody so legendary. I know we had talent people who were always looking around for cool people who were in the area doing shows, and we would try to get them to appear for one or two days out in the suburbs. But do you know anything at all, Chris, about how we actually managed to find Iggy Pop and get him on the show?
CV: I don’t. I think because we had [Michael] Stipe and Kate Pierson and Steve Buscemi and various others in the first season, it started to get a little bit easier for us to at least have the talent folks at Nickelodeon get calls back from the people who represented these rock ’n’ rollers. I think it was the Stipe factor, for sure, that helped us get Iggy. But I don’t think anybody on the show, unless I’m mistaken, had any connection with Iggy. I think they just went through his agents and managers and sent him the script and some episodes. I think for that second season, we did a cameo clip reel that was a couple minutes long and had Syd Straw and Richard Edson and Stipe and Kate and all the others in there. And I think once some of these actors and musicians got to watch that, that really helped a lot. It made them realize that they were stepping into something that seemed pretty cool.

Part three of our Pete And Pete walkthrough with the show’s creators goes into some of the series’ most famous moments.

theavc:

The A.V. Club: How did you land Iggy Pop to play the role of her father?

WM: We probably get the most questions about how we got him, what it was like to have him, and the buzz surrounding somebody so legendary. I know we had talent people who were always looking around for cool people who were in the area doing shows, and we would try to get them to appear for one or two days out in the suburbs. But do you know anything at all, Chris, about how we actually managed to find Iggy Pop and get him on the show?

CV: I don’t. I think because we had [Michael] Stipe and Kate Pierson and Steve Buscemi and various others in the first season, it started to get a little bit easier for us to at least have the talent folks at Nickelodeon get calls back from the people who represented these rock ’n’ rollers. I think it was the Stipe factor, for sure, that helped us get Iggy. But I don’t think anybody on the show, unless I’m mistaken, had any connection with Iggy. I think they just went through his agents and managers and sent him the script and some episodes. I think for that second season, we did a cameo clip reel that was a couple minutes long and had Syd Straw and Richard Edson and Stipe and Kate and all the others in there. And I think once some of these actors and musicians got to watch that, that really helped a lot. It made them realize that they were stepping into something that seemed pretty cool.

Part three of our Pete And Pete walkthrough with the show’s creators goes into some of the series’ most famous moments.